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Avoid These 7 Common Mistakes When Using A Condom To Avoid Contracting STDs

Most men feel very cocky and confident that they know all there is to know when it comes to condom use. While this might be true for some, a lot of men are still making life-risking mistakes when they protect themselves. 


It is very pertinent that we all know the right way to use a condom, as using it wrongly will not only bring about unwanted pregnancy, but could cause a host of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, STDs, including HIV.

Avoid these mistakes to make sure you stay protected.

1. Not checking for visible damage. Nearly 75% of people never bother looking for tears or holes -- even if they use their teeth to open the packet (don't!) or snag the condom on their jewelry or fingernails.

2. Not checking the expiration date. Yes, that little date printed on the wrapper is news to 61% of users. Condoms last very long - up to 5 years for plain ones, though only 2 years or so for those with a spermicide, which gradually breaks down the latex. If a condom is sticky or brittle, toss it.

3. Putting it on late in the action. About 43% of students in a sex-behavior study donned the condom after penetration had already occurred. Presumably they didn't know that some sperm can be released before the final fireworks, posing pregnancy and STD risks.

4. Not leaving room at the top. It's apparently news to four out of 10 condom users that before putting it on, you need to gently squeeze the tip of the condom to remove any trapped air and leave space for the sperm. Otherwise, the condom's more likely to break.

5. Putting it on wrong. Don't you hate when that happens? About 30% of people put it on inside out and don't realize that an inside-out condom is more likely to slip off. The safest thing to do? Start with a new one. The right way: The condom should look a little like a ski cap with the bottom edges rolled up (not under). The cap should fit over the penis so that the brim unrolls easily down the shaft.

6. Slipping off during sex. To find a good fit, buy a variety of styles and sizes (there really aren't that many choices) and try them at leisure. Remember, natural lambskin sounds nice and can prevent pregnancy, but it doesn't protect against the viruses that cause AIDS, hepatitis, and herpes. Only latex can do that.

7. Taking the condom off too soon. Not a good idea. For the 15% of men who report doing this, losing an erection is a big reason. But erections can come and go during sex; besides, ejaculation can occur without an erection, bringing with it all the risks of pregnancy and STDs.

~Pulse.ng~It is very pertinent that we all know the right way to use a condom, as using it wrongly will not only bring about unwanted pregnancy, but could cause a host of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, STDs, including HIV.
-Advertisement-

Avoid these mistakes to make sure you stay protected.

1. Not checking for visible damage. Nearly 75% of people never bother looking for tears or holes -- even if they use their teeth to open the packet (don't!) or snag the condom on their jewelry or fingernails.

2. Not checking the expiration date. Yes, that little date printed on the wrapper is news to 61% of users. Condoms last very long - up to 5 years for plain ones, though only 2 years or so for those with a spermicide, which gradually breaks down the latex. If a condom is sticky or brittle, toss it.

3. Putting it on late in the action. About 43% of students in a sex-behavior study donned the condom after penetration had already occurred. Presumably they didn't know that some sperm can be released before the final fireworks, posing pregnancy and STD risks.

4. Not leaving room at the top. It's apparently news to four out of 10 condom users that before putting it on, you need to gently squeeze the tip of the condom to remove any trapped air and leave space for the sperm. Otherwise, the condom's more likely to break.

5. Putting it on wrong. Don't you hate when that happens? About 30% of people put it on inside out and don't realize that an inside-out condom is more likely to slip off. The safest thing to do? Start with a new one. The right way: The condom should look a little like a ski cap with the bottom edges rolled up (not under). The cap should fit over the penis so that the brim unrolls easily down the shaft.

6. Slipping off during sex. To find a good fit, buy a variety of styles and sizes (there really aren't that many choices) and try them at leisure. Remember, natural lambskin sounds nice and can prevent pregnancy, but it doesn't protect against the viruses that cause AIDS, hepatitis, and herpes. Only latex can do that.

7. Taking the condom off too soon. Not a good idea. For the 15% of men who report doing this, losing an erection is a big reason. But erections can come and go during sex; besides, ejaculation can occur without an erection, bringing with it all the risks of pregnancy and STDs.

~Pulse.ng~It is very pertinent that we all know the right way to use a condom, as using it wrongly will not only bring about unwanted pregnancy, but could cause a host of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, STDs, including HIV.
-Advertisement-

Avoid these mistakes to make sure you stay protected.

1. Not checking for visible damage. Nearly 75% of people never bother looking for tears or holes -- even if they use their teeth to open the packet (don't!) or snag the condom on their jewelry or fingernails.

2. Not checking the expiration date. Yes, that little date printed on the wrapper is news to 61% of users. Condoms last very long - up to 5 years for plain ones, though only 2 years or so for those with a spermicide, which gradually breaks down the latex. If a condom is sticky or brittle, toss it.

3. Putting it on late in the action. About 43% of students in a sex-behavior study donned the condom after penetration had already occurred. Presumably they didn't know that some sperm can be released before the final fireworks, posing pregnancy and STD risks.

4. Not leaving room at the top. It's apparently news to four out of 10 condom users that before putting it on, you need to gently squeeze the tip of the condom to remove any trapped air and leave space for the sperm. Otherwise, the condom's more likely to break.

5. Putting it on wrong. Don't you hate when that happens? About 30% of people put it on inside out and don't realize that an inside-out condom is more likely to slip off. The safest thing to do? Start with a new one. The right way: The condom should look a little like a ski cap with the bottom edges rolled up (not under). The cap should fit over the penis so that the brim unrolls easily down the shaft.

6. Slipping off during sex. To find a good fit, buy a variety of styles and sizes (there really aren't that many choices) and try them at leisure. Remember, natural lambskin sounds nice and can prevent pregnancy, but it doesn't protect against the viruses that cause AIDS, hepatitis, and herpes. Only latex can do that.

7. Taking the condom off too soon. Not a good idea. For the 15% of men who report doing this, losing an erection is a big reason. But erections can come and go during sex; besides, ejaculation can occur without an erection, bringing with it all the risks of pregnancy and STDs.

~Pulse.ng~It is very pertinent that we all know the right way to use a condom, as using it wrongly will not only bring about unwanted pregnancy, but could cause a host of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, STDs, including HIV.
-Advertisement-

Avoid these mistakes to make sure you stay protected.

1. Not checking for visible damage. Nearly 75% of people never bother looking for tears or holes -- even if they use their teeth to open the packet (don't!) or snag the condom on their jewelry or fingernails.

2. Not checking the expiration date. Yes, that little date printed on the wrapper is news to 61% of users. Condoms last very long - up to 5 years for plain ones, though only 2 years or so for those with a spermicide, which gradually breaks down the latex. If a condom is sticky or brittle, toss it.

3. Putting it on late in the action. About 43% of students in a sex-behavior study donned the condom after penetration had already occurred. Presumably they didn't know that some sperm can be released before the final fireworks, posing pregnancy and STD risks.

4. Not leaving room at the top. It's apparently news to four out of 10 condom users that before putting it on, you need to gently squeeze the tip of the condom to remove any trapped air and leave space for the sperm. Otherwise, the condom's more likely to break.

5. Putting it on wrong. Don't you hate when that happens? About 30% of people put it on inside out and don't realize that an inside-out condom is more likely to slip off. The safest thing to do? Start with a new one. The right way: The condom should look a little like a ski cap with the bottom edges rolled up (not under). The cap should fit over the penis so that the brim unrolls easily down the shaft.

6. Slipping off during sex. To find a good fit, buy a variety of styles and sizes (there really aren't that many choices) and try them at leisure. Remember, natural lambskin sounds nice and can prevent pregnancy, but it doesn't protect against the viruses that cause AIDS, hepatitis, and herpes. Only latex can do that.

7. Taking the condom off too soon. Not a good idea. For the 15% of men who report doing this, losing an erection is a big reason. But erections can come and go during sex; besides, ejaculation can occur without an erection, bringing with it all the risks of pregnancy and STDs.

~Pulse.ng~It is very pertinent that we all know the right way to use a condom, as using it wrongly will not only bring about unwanted pregnancy, but could cause a host of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, STDs, including HIV.
-Advertisement-

Avoid these mistakes to make sure you stay protected.

1. Not checking for visible damage. Nearly 75% of people never bother looking for tears or holes -- even if they use their teeth to open the packet (don't!) or snag the condom on their jewelry or fingernails.

2. Not checking the expiration date. Yes, that little date printed on the wrapper is news to 61% of users. Condoms last very long - up to 5 years for plain ones, though only 2 years or so for those with a spermicide, which gradually breaks down the latex. If a condom is sticky or brittle, toss it.

3. Putting it on late in the action. About 43% of students in a sex-behavior study donned the condom after penetration had already occurred. Presumably they didn't know that some sperm can be released before the final fireworks, posing pregnancy and STD risks.

4. Not leaving room at the top. It's apparently news to four out of 10 condom users that before putting it on, you need to gently squeeze the tip of the condom to remove any trapped air and leave space for the sperm. Otherwise, the condom's more likely to break.

5. Putting it on wrong. Don't you hate when that happens? About 30% of people put it on inside out and don't realize that an inside-out condom is more likely to slip off. The safest thing to do? Start with a new one. The right way: The condom should look a little like a ski cap with the bottom edges rolled up (not under). The cap should fit over the penis so that the brim unrolls easily down the shaft.

6. Slipping off during sex. To find a good fit, buy a variety of styles and sizes (there really aren't that many choices) and try them at leisure. Remember, natural lambskin sounds nice and can prevent pregnancy, but it doesn't protect against the viruses that cause AIDS, hepatitis, and herpes. Only latex can do that.

7. Taking the condom off too soon. Not a good idea. For the 15% of men who report doing this, losing an erection is a big reason. But erections can come and go during sex; besides, ejaculation can occur without an erection, bringing with it all the risks of pregnancy and STDs.

~Pulse.ng~
Khabza Mkhize

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